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. >> good evening. i'm the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the library booktalk sister i want to thank the founders society for cosponsoring tonight's talk. tonight's program features logan beirne who is the author of a new book on america's first chief executive entitled "blood of tyrants: george washington and the forging of the presidency." this is very much a yale law school block. it began as a paper while logan was a law school student. the paper was written -- after graduation from law school in 2008 and working two years in a law firm, logan returned to yale law school in 2010 as a scholar and began turning the paper into the book that we feature tonight. appropriate laid we have the professor with those to comment on the book. professor is a highly distinguished member of the yale law school factoid. is the author of numerous books, monographs and articles, and several of his books have been featured in previous book club series sponsored by our library. according to a recently published study by my colleague, fred sugar, professor eskridge is
. ratified by the senate or the law of the land. and it sounds to me like one of the punchlines of your account, even though washington powers did grow, he did have a republican understanding, which required him to be very attentive to the commitments that were made by the nation. in the 1770s, we were not in position to make international commitments, but we did it with didn't have a lot of statutes on the book, but we have resolutions. would you not say when it washingtons experiences the commander-in-chief has a constitutional obligation to take seriously the commitment the nation has made in conventions like the geneva convention. .. >> i think it's important for the commander-in-chief to be looking at commitments that we make. >> others? more questions? speeches? opinions about canada? [laughter] >> [inaudible]. >> the former dean wants to make a speech about her youth. [laughter] >> i spent many summers canoeing in canada and singing every morning oh, candidate, which is beautiful. for that reason i made a point in junior high school of studying the history of canada, and why i ha
team of law enforcement folks who have done this the right way, by building from facts up to a theory rather than from a theory out. >> governor, the "boston globe" says it all had this morning for boston -- edging toward not normal, but there is still a lot of concern. based on what you know, has the threat passed? >> i think we think so. there are a lot of leads that law enforcement is still pursuing, the fbi and the atf, the state police and local police as well. there are a lot of questions that all of us have and that law enforcement have yet to answer for us including questions directly to the suspect, but there isn't any basis for concern about another imminent threat. >> let me ask you some particulars about the surviving suspect, dzhokhar tsarnaev, who is now in the hospital. apparently he has a wound to the throat. did he try to commit suicide? >> i don't know the answer to that. >> do you know when doctors are saying he might actually be able to communicate? is there a real question about whether he'll be able to speak? >> i don't know those answers, david. i do know that h
that law enforcement is still pursuing, the fbi and the atf, the state police and local police as well. there are a lot of questions that all of us have and that law enforcement have yet to answer for us including questions direct directly to the suspect, but there isn't any basis for concern about another imminent threat. >> let me ask you some particulars about the surviving suspect, dzhokhar tsarnaev, who is now in the hospital. appare apparently he has a wound to the throat. did he try to commit suicide? >> i don't know the answer to that. >> do you know when doctors are saying he might actually be able to communicate? is there a real question about whether he'll be able to speak? >> i don't know those answers, david. i do know that he is in serious condition, but he's stable. and there are investigators prepared to interview him when he's able to be interviewed. >> the question about him coming onto the radar of the fbi two years ago, he was interviewed, he was tracked at the request of the russians, according to federal officials. that's questions now, for you and authorities in
times writing about what he called immigration fear. country and stronger role of law, passed copperheads of reform. -- past comprehensive reform. then there is this summary from the new york times editorial. there is a better way to be safer. pass an immigration bill if terrorists, drug traffickers, and gang bangers with sharp meters in the immigrant haystack, then shrink the haystack. get 11 million people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspe
are pursuing avenues of product of the element today that are not restricted by existing law, but we are also seeking additional flexibility in other promising areas. the postal service provides a delivery platform for the $800 billion mailing industry that employs 8 million people. it is a big industry, and the way to keep that platform strong is to innovate in ways that improve the experience of delivery and the experience that people have with their mail. having the flexibility to create new products and pursue business opportunities is an important way to keep postal service and the milling industry in total healthy. and i hope everyone is as optimistic as i am that we can get the flexibility through law to make this happen. as i look out to the future, there is an lot to build on. marketing mail or direct mail it is rebounding nicely. we went through a rough spot there with the recession, and despite all the ways that people change in terms of communicating and selling products, marketing mail continues to garner roughly 12% of the total spent in marketing in this united states. it has b
get to game. members of law enforcement, first responders and marathon participants were honored. thank you for your tweet about whether the u.s. citizen suspect should be treated as enemy combatant. you were split but say constitutional rights are important. that's it for us in washington. >> chris: i'm chris wallace. we'll get the latest on the terror attack in boston when we talk live to police commissioner ed davis next. ♪ ♪ >> we are eternally grateful for outcome tonight. we have a suspect in custody. >> chris: boston is happy to have him t suspect in custody. but what does it tell us about the cracks in security? we ask two congressional leaders on intelligence issues. senator dianne feinstein and congressman pete king. then, how do we find terrorists without giving up our freedom? with cameras and images everywhere, is more brother the answer? we sit down with philadelphia police commissioner charles ramsey an terrorism effort phillip flood. plus, the bombings raise new question about the drive for immigration reform and gun control. we ask the sunday panel how the at
a good chance of passing the house and being signed into law by the president. the legislation is not perfect. there are provisions that most if not all senators can support. some will appeal to more than others. no one will like every provision. still images and our economy and neglect our humanitarian responsibilities. magnitudeof that would never be easy to address and never more necessary. cannot be achieved by means .arry it we have addressed labor needs of a growing and competitive economy with a workable worker policy and sensible expansion of hi visa programs. we make it more difficult for employers to hire people who come here illegally. we have confronted the reality of people who came here illegally by proposing lengthy practices and does not place lawful immigrants at a disadvantage. finally, we have recognized our most people who cross borders illegally overstay their visas have done so for the same reason that attracted other immigrants here -- to find economic opportunity and a better life for their families and to live in a society that values human dignity. we
way to proceed. i do not believe, under the military commission law, that he is eligible for that. it would be unconstitutional to do that. let me say this, chris. one of the great things about america is that we come together at times of trial. i very much regret the fact that there are those that want to precipitate a debate over whether he's an enemy combatant or whether he is a terrorist, a murderer, et cetera. federal law, we've had 435 terrorist convictions under federal law. we've had 100-plus arrests. there have been maybe half a dozen under the military commission. it is really very clear to me that the course that can be taken -- you've got the high value interrogation group. they're skilled. they know how to do this. the miranda right can be read at a later time. he has reportedly been shot through the throat. he's intubated. he can't talk now. so there is time to do the investigation, to make a clear assessment, and to move from there. so i really regret all of this discussion, which is creating a conflict that need not be there. the administration is ready for this. >
by the immigrants themselves as has been much immigration law in the past. now,, i think it's too -- look, we want a rigorous, right, everify system. what does that mean? it's a system, you go get a job, 16 million people change -- initiate a job every year. that is they go and apply for a job every year. 16 million in the united states. i want a system that when they go, they say, boy, you are verified by the american government as being legally in the united states, legally eable to vote, and verified. and sell that to the employer and if the employer hires somebody that doesn't go through that verification system, i think the weight of the law should fall on them like never seen before. there should be penalties and there should be jail sentences so you don't hire people undocumented, illegally in this country ever again. that's going to cost money to set up that verification system. but let's just agree on this. we are going to set up such a verification system because that guarantees the american people that they feel we're not fooling around and we're not just -- we're going to legalize 11 m
to the success to the law enforcement investigation. it will be equally important as the city works to reclaim and restore boylston street. we have been working closely with business owners to near the plaza and opening up a mobile city hall close to the area for visitors to have fast a access to the city. also our team has been in communication with the victims and the families who continue to work as we move towards opening the area of boston for our public once again. i want to say to my team behind me, thank you for doing a great job. last week or so, all the agencies and since friday have been working overtime to make sure that the plan works to reestablish boylston street. they have been working under all the plans. thank you. >> heather: you've been listening to a live news conference. the mayor talking about a five-step plan now to reopen boylston street, perhaps the most famous street in america. the area specifically affected when this bombing happened last monday at the boston marathon. let's go to adam housley who is still standing by live for us. i understand you were just in the
's failure to strengthen gun control laws. >> all in all, this was a pretty shameful day for washington. >> schieffer: we'll hear this morning from the newtown victims' families. >> my mom was not scared in the halls of sandy hook. they should not be scared to cast a vote to protect millions of people. >> schieffer: it was a week of lows and highs. ♪ sweet caroline ♪ >> schieffer: and we'll cover it all because this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and gps're gbility are argoodmorning, and h boston police commissioner ed davis. i know you told reporters earlier this morning, that you can't speck plate on the motives of these two young men, but can i ask you this-- were they planning other acts after the bombs they set off at the marathon? >> i personally believe they were. i personally believe they were. we have reason to believe, based upon the evidence that was found at that scene, the explosions, the explosive ordinance that was unexploded, and the firepower that they had, that the
access to health care next year as result the law. news programs fall under the purview of our witnesses and in sibelius. am sure you're are quite busy, madam secretary. in 167 days millions of americans will begin enrolling in health insurance plan submission marketplace. time is short. we need to use each of these days to make sure the marketplaces are up and running, ready to help uninsured americans axis affordable coverage. the present budget request a total of $5.2 billion for program management at the centers for medicare and medicaid services. of this, $1.5 billion would we to establish health insurance marketplaces. i am concerned that not every state, including montana, would have an insurance marketplace established in time. the moneyow how requested would be used to ensure the marketplaces would be ready to go. the budget also requests $550 million for outreach and education for the health insurance marketplace is. for the marketplaces to work, people need to know about them. people need to know their options, how to enroll. i would also like to know -- i want these new marke
in boston as an scuse because our law toughens i think things up. >> the senate bill would have multiple background chengs and make sure anyone over-staying a visa would be detected. right now, there is no check on airport departures. as for those who came without visas, lindsay graham says this. >> now is the time to bring all the 11 million out of the shadows and find out who they are. most of them are here to work. but wree may find some terrorists in our midst who, have been hiding in the shadows, when it comes to the entry/exit. the 19 hijackers were all student who is overstayed their visas and the system didn't capture that. >> the senate holds the second two of hearings on immigration reform tomorrow. >> it will be very interesting. an emotional ballgame in beston last night, after a week of terror. >> shannon: a yesterday's home game was made more special by neil diamond, who made it there on the red-eye. members of law enforcement, first responders and marathon participants were also honored. david ortiz had a passionate rally cry. >> it doesn't say red sox, it says boston... w
them especially to pray for the magnificent police, law enforcement people, and first attenders who have done an amazing job and continue to be doing crucial work, they are a model for us all. >> but the thing i'm interested in, that the primary thing that you have been hearing is, is that fear. and what do you say about how ith n cope with that? >> well one of the first things i say is that fear loves isolation. and what we need to do is be in touch with each other. so i'm encouraging my community to text and email and call people they know and love and care about. get together as they can. because we are reminders to each other of the faith we carry and the trust we've known and the love we've known through the years that gives us the courage to continue on in what we're doing. and second thing i do is i try to send them,end the en back to their old scriptures where the psalm is the lord is my shepherd, i shall not want. >> anything good that you see coming out of the response to this terrible thing? amazing, there's been immense good. when the sky is at its darkest, we can see th
and run database checks and law enforcement intelligence indices, reach out to allies and let's say there wasn't much there, they he work with the fsb. >> used to be called the kgb. >> the rough equivalent of the fbi for russia. >> but we do admit one thing. we a game changer now. we to go after every bit of this information and track it down and be on top. the patriot law we got to start looking at people's computers, the internet. we got to start changing. >> geraldo: at least when you question a guy you put him on a list and when comes back from russia after is six months say hey, where have you been, man? we'll be right back. it doesn't matter where a good idea comes from, it only matters that it shows up and makes things better. in that spirit, verizon is proud to announce the powerful answers award. 10 million dollars in prizes for the beseas. s so big, they have the power to change everything. whether it's our inspiration, or yours, the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. the powerful answers award from verizon. starts with ground beef, onions and pepper
. neither was infanticide. in fact, the roman law mandated it of especially deformed infants. infants would be left out, taken up into slavery or just die. so you see the moral transformation of the west in accordance with christianity. whether you're christian or not, you can say, yeah, i see this happening. certain things now are held to be bad that before, people that were indifferent about or thought was good. and then beginning -- well, actually, i argue beginning in the early 1500s but certainly by the 1900s and the 20th century, the sort of arc of christianity starts to descend s and as we have increasing secularization of the west, that coip sides with the rise of liberalism because they really are, in many ways if not all ways, the same thing. and you see the same moral issues, you see a clash between the christian moral world view and liberalism. and liberalism generally takes the side of the kind of things that were affirmed in the roman empire. so just as an historian of ethics, i can see that. not even have to take sides, you still see the same ethical transformation historical
'm actually concerned about that. [inaudible] just something broke yesterday. john kerry's son-in-law, which didn't come out in the vetting process, his son-in-law is an iranian. and iranian americans with very close world is in iran. and that is, it's a breakdown of the vetting process. and so i will ask you all, are you concerned about this? >> i would have to know more about the iranians. most iranian americans of course our strong opponents of every regime i don't know about this person. >> [inaudible] >> this could be a problem, to come in terms of pressure and blackmail. i would be concerned about that, you know. i would say if the state department is now aware of that fact, they may be able to take steps to protect him in some way or put him in some of the portfolio. but i don't know about the situation. >> since we are losing some media coverage, i just want to reiterate that there's a book called "persecuted: the global assault on christians." three of the three authors are here on this panel. we are grateful for your time. also, new website, persecutionreport.org. please don't neg
law enforcement, of deep concern of ammunition, guns and working bombs these men had. they were so disciplined. >> any indication of another sleeper cell? >> right now, no evidence of a broader plot involving more people here, but law enforcement officials say they can't take that chance. the investigation is full tilt to find that out. >> okay, pierre, thanks very much. let's get more on this from our team of analysis from our team, dan abrams, brad garrett and richard clarke. dan, let me begin with you. the question about the questioning of the witness, at least at first he will not be read his miranda rights. >> that's right. you heard pierre talk about this public safety exception. basically the supreme court has recognized that, in some cases, if there's the possibility of an imminent threat that you can ask limited questions without further reading someone their miranda rights and that's what they're saying here, now, down the road, will someone challenge it and say this shouldn't have happened? sure. courts may have to resolve the specifics in this case later. but there is n
to answer the question of why >> i and i think all the law enforcement professionals are hoping for a host of reasons that the suspect survives because we have a million questions. those questions need to be answered. a justice dept source says dzhokar will will face federal terrorism charges and may also face state murder charges -- adding that he could be charged before he leaves the hospital. in boston i'm stacey cohan reporting. >> federal agents confirm that the f-b-i interviewed the older brother, tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011, after being tipped off by a foreign government. the suspect identified himself as ethnic chechen from southern russia and officials there believed tamerlan was going to travel to the country's region to join unspecified underground groups. the fbi says it interviewed tsarnaev and relatives, and did not find any domestic or foreign terrorism activity. meanwhile, tsarnaev's uncle says he had a falling-out with the 26-year-old over his increased commitment to islam. boston cardinal sean o'malley is dedicating mass today to the bombing victims. it's being held at the
community and the attacks are impossible for the federal law enforcement community to stop. so how to make ourselves more resilient? the steps we need to take are not that sexy. we need to upgrade our transit systems and infrastructure so as to make them less vulnerable to attacks. for example, flynn notes the u.s. navy has invested more in protecting the single port of san diego that is home to the pacific fleet than the department of homeland security has invest ed in the ports of ls angeles, long beach, san francisco, oakland, seattle, and tacoma combined, upon which a bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack, which is still the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure that the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it's easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope that in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column
for the people here, judge. >> judge jeanine: that's great. let me ask you a question. with so many law enforcement agencies on this. the shootout in watertown. >> reporter: right. >> judge jeanine: dhokhar is bleeding and one block behind the perimeter. wouldn't there be a trail to his location whether he is one block beyond or not? >> there was some what of a trail to his location and that is how he was spotted. the homeowner came out to smoke a cigarette and notice that there was a door to the shed open and there was bloody clothes and blood stains going into the boat where the shrink wrap over the top of the boat was disturbed. the individual picked up the shrink wrap and saw him and backed off and called 911. why there wasn't a larger or longer blood trail i can't answer that. >> judge jeanine: thank goodness for the thermal sensorring from the helicopters as well as a very alert woman who notice or the man who noticed thae blood around the boat. mike tobin, thanks so much. and now to catherine herridge, fox news chief intelligence correspondent. catherine, what do we know about th
was hiding in and surrendered to authorities after about 25 minutes of negotiations with law enforcement. that's according to an official with knowledge of how he was taken into custody. we did know that authorities were having some type of dialogue with the suspect as he lay in that boat. we didn't know precisely how long it lasted, wolf. >> if the charges, joe, are actually filed today in the coming hour or two or three, will the justice department just make an announcement? will there be a news conference? do we have any indication how they're going to let the american public know that charges have been filed? >> we have been told that there's potential for a news conference, that is, of course, if the authorities go ahead and file those charges. it's not necessary for the suspect to actually be presented before a judge today, though these are extraordinary circumstances, and they could come up with any number of other provisions. so we'll have to wait and see. and that's what law enforcement authorities are telling us, wolf. >> and these are federal charges, joe, so the attorney gene
and terrorist groups. leven said to hold him under these circumstances would be contrary to our laws and jeopardize our effort to prosecute him. during interviews before suspects are read their rights is often not admissible during the trial. the issue on miranda rights is further complicated because the u.s. is a u.s. citizen. many of the rules cannot be used on americans. live in the newsroom, katie utehs. ktvu news. >>> people are in texas are being allowed in their homes. curfew is still in effect and there is limited water and electricity. many are still trying to learn the condition of family and friends hurt in the explosion. >> it's really hectic, but we are patient because we know the extent of damage on the other side. and we got friends and family that we don't know about over there. >> 14 people died in the fertilizer plant explosion, including 11 emergency responders. 200 more were injured. >>> this weekend, texas is also remembering the deadly raid on the branch compound in waco. 76 people died in a fire twenty years ago following a raid on the compound. waco and west
happened including american support for -- as a law enforcement and intelligence practitioner is inclusiveness in america. as a law enforcement tool, i worried all along when i was in the business that americans would start to say as a result of events like this that there are real americans and other americans. that kind of mentality if we ever get it will accelerate i think these cases of radicalization. kids like this when they take the oath will say i took the oath but i'm still not accepted. >> to what exstent one of the dangers here? one can overread too much. these may be two cases of a bad situation. to what extent might be assimilation machine in the u.s. be broken down or not functioning as well as it used to. in europe, minority communities were excluded marginalized but not in the united states. the polling data suggests that. but does this tell us maybe we should pay attention to that? >> compared to what? the assimilation mod until the united states works marvelously compared to france or germany or great britain. if you look back in history, the irish, the jews,
. pipe bombs, all the ingredients to build more bombs. i guess the suspicion is this is what law enforcement authorities have told me over the past few days. these two brothers if they would have gotten away with it, they were going to do more of this down the road. >> i think you're absolutely right, wolf. it was actually another side to that coin. either they were going to do more and that's what the other explosives were for, or perhaps when we are aware now there was a third pressure cooker bomb. was there in fact a third perpetrator who was supposed to join them on the day of the boston marathon? was that bomb built for that person to put in place at the same time? while we optimistically are hopeful we have accounted for everybody who departed this attack on the marathon, we can't yet rule it out. those other explosives could have other explanations, other perpetrators or other attacks. >> i'm going to bring tom fuentes into the conversation in a moment. where did they get the explosives, where did they pay for the explosives, questions we're going to continue to explore as
without instruments and visibility is very poor. however, according to law enforcement on friday morning as we prepare this program, the suspects her brother. the 19-year-old and a 20 six road. they reportedly came from a region near chechnya. the 19-year-old, dzhokhar tsarnaev, lived in cambridge. he had a scholarship toward college a couple of years ago. his brother, tamerlan tsarnaev, died after a firefight with police friday morning. he was worn in russia and became a legal resident in 2007. the prayer -- the brothers are believed to have entered the country 10 years ago. the associated press spoke to the father. he said i son is an angel. he said he is an intelligent boy. confirms the worst fears of those responsible for national security. there are enemies among us. >> i agree. a moreard to imagine more american place to hit in this vicious and cowardly act. i think the political implications of it are immediate. there will be a great resistance to immigration reform. i think it is a blow there. beyond that, it is a reminder that since september 11, there has not been a terrorist a
dead after a dramatic shootout with law enforcement early friday morning. his 19-year-old dzhokhar escaped on foot precipitating a shelter in place order for the entire boston area. but the much sought after armed and dangerous teen was found wounded and incoherent in a boat parked in the backyard of a suburban watertown home. discovered not by the hundreds of armed officers who had been searching for him for hours but by the home's owner, reportedly out for a smoke. with one assailant dead and the other in police custody, the people of watertown and the entire boston area expressed their enormous gratitude and sense of relief with spontaneous cheers and applause on friday night. the crisis is over. now the politics begin and this is where our responsibility in the media shifts. in the heat of the crisis, media take on the job of informational clearinghouse, keeping the public up to date, sharing critical information and get the information out right and fast. granted, those are goals that can contradict at times. now we must step back from the incessant drumbeat of breaking news t
owners and residents of this area have played a critical factor in the success law enforcement's investigation and it will be equally important as the city works to reclaim and restore boylston street. we have been working closely with business owners and the city business resource center to set up the park plaza. we'll also open up a mobile city hall close to the area for businesses to have more convenient access to representatives of the city. also a team has been in communication with the victims and the families and will continue to work with them as we move towards opening the area of boston for our public once again. i just want to say to my team behind me, thank you. you're doing a great job. last week or so all the agencies, and since friday, been working overtime making sure we have a plan that works to re-establish boylston street in the city of boston. i'll have rene who's working on all the plans. thank you. >> thank you, mayor. good afternoon. the city has been working the restoration an re-entry strategy for the copley area since last wednesday. a team comprised o
the defendant, we know that is a dangerous situations or us. these laws will be changed in a way that we will be misrepresented and and therefore our chapters across the country have been fighting back against that. we have been organizing people to register voters and get whatever is necessary, if it is an id that they tell you you need, while we fight that law, you have to have the id. our chapters have gone out and organized in churches and areas across this country to ensure that our people are empowered with what is necessary to fight back against oppression and the walls of evil. we have done that. we saw in 2012 election, we stood on line, they would not be silenced, they got up, they with they needed to do and five. [applause] -- and fought back. [applause] are stillstates that working on suppression. they decided that we may have been able to overcome in one election, but that does not mean they will not work on continuing to figure out how to disenfranchise our people. we canurt keyesff ofe ice and gp because we may feel that we election.- won one it means nothing. if they can
as the law enforcement officers streamed out of the community following the capture of the suspect. the vigil gave the residents a chance to gather together and thank the officers that strive to keep them safe. tucker, aly, clayton? >> tucker: thank you. >> clayton: we have an interesting picture this morning, of what it was like to live in this home. this mother raising these two children there in this family, also their daughter. this comes to us this morning from alyssa kilzer, 23-year-old who used to go to their mom's house, a is a lan, spa. >> alisyn: sort of. >> clayton: if you call it that. she used to run a day spa. moved it to her home. people would come to your home. you are around the family on a regular basis. she went there to get facials and beauty treatments for five or six years. >> alisyn: yes. >> tucker: it's chaotic home. filled with the sounds of arguing and food cooking. and clothes all over the place. she describes a family that became increasingly religious over the years that she -- >> clayton: radical. >> tucker: exactly. >> alisyn: the boston bombers had two sisters.
in cleveland working for a law firm, and this next call comes from bobby in ohio. >> caller: i've got a question for you in regards to the comment you made about rg 3:and the article about him being called an uncle tom. why would you state that person saying that would be republican? wouldn't democrats actually sometimes have feelings like that? i'm a republican, and i don't feel that way towards rg iii, so i'm just curious why you would say that. >> guest: you either misunderstood what i said, or i said it badly. what i said was the espn guy criticized rg iii because he thought he was republican. he said there's a rumor he's republican, i don't know about that. he's got a white fiancee, i don't know about that. he called him a cornball brother because he suspected that rg iii was a republican, but he had a white fiancee. that is why this caster called him a cornball brother which i think is a racist thing. so i'm sorry if i misexplained it. >> host: go ahead, bobby, you're still on the line. >> caller: i appreciate that. i agree the same way you do then. i think it's totally a racist
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
both would have to sign before to become law. they would have to agree on executive order, sipri court nominees, decisions as commander-in-chief of the military. each would have their own vice president for a small personal staff but all other appointments the executive branch or the judiciary would be a single joint appointee. with that they could make decisions so much more quickly. you sort of have a democrat nominating a democratic person or republican for republican. you would have a bipartisan nominee and there wouldn't be a confirmation in the position will be filled much more quick way. in all likelihood they would divide up primary responsibilities. one might direct health care and the other education. one might focus on our relations with european countries and the other with asian countries but when it would come time to make decisions they would have to agree. all decisions would have to be shared decisions. joint decision would make it more representative decision-making. instead of having a republican president champing the platform of the republican party or a democratic
deserve answers. >> reporter: answers that the full force of u.s. law enforcement and intelligence agencies are racing to learn. was there foreign help or training? older brother tamerlan spent six months overseas last year. he went to chechnya, areas where islamic extremists and violent chechen separatists are known to operate. >> he was away for six months. was that long enough to have done what? >> that's long enough to have done a lot of things. if you're motivated, have the connections, there's plenty of time there to be initiated into a group, receive training and potentially a lot of training. >> reporter: robert mcfadden is a former agent in the n.c.i.s., the naval criminal investigative service. his 30-plus years experience in counterterrorism includes work on the al qaeda bombing of the u.s.s. coal in 2000. >> something just blew up. reporter: mcfadden believes the number one priority of investigators is to be sure there are no accomplices still at large. >> are there other events coming? what other events are planned and doing everything possible to rule out that there c
of law, but this is the last one i read and then move it to q&a. it is simply live with the book but i hope to get out of it. the purpose of this book is twofold. to familiarize the american public and decision-makers, specifically the senior war college and to encourage discussion on how to improve the education of their important missions. the latter sense of the idea that there's room for improvement. cocos must be clear. whether war college goals are clear and whether articulated goals are supported by practices and processes that these institutions as part of the discussion. admiral james stafford is provided to think or take a nation of busy of for college education goes up to 2011 national war college convocation by describing this situation when he arrived at national in 1991. quote, i knew it i was good at and what i do well, driving a destroyer or crusader, leading a boarding party with a surrogate mother, landed in an air defense. beating sailors on the deck leadership, but fails to sense what i did not know or understand well. global politics and grand strategy, importance
or full strength of the law, will happen almost immediately and then from there, the citizenship will be probably a decade or more down the road. >> and the president's role in all this? what do you hear from the congressman? >> the congressman has been probably the best -- the biggest democratic critic of the president on immigration, particularly in the congress. people a few immigration who said obama helped them. but he got himself arrested protesting the deportation policy in 2010. from what i understand it's been difficult for the president to figure out what his role is because he really is supposed to be doing the cheerleader role for the house and senate rather than actually being presidential in the sense of -- >> or negotiating. >> or negotiating. >> keep in mind when this was last being, the same concept was last being discussed in the bush administration, there were members of both the department of homeland security and the commerce department up on the hill every day when they were doing this i'm not seing that now. >> thank you very much for your time, appreciate
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
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